Chicago Typewriter Episode 16 (Final) Recap

Our trio’s past and present story plays out in this final episode…

Chicago Typewriter Episode 16 (Final) Recap 

Here we go, the final episode of Chicago Typewriter…

1930… Han Se Joo (Yoo Ah In) is trapped at the edge of a cliff by Baek Tae Min (Kwak Si Yang) and the police. Se Joo raises his gun to his head. He thinks he’d rather stay true to the cause of an independent Korea by killing himself. He stares at Tae Min knowing he won’t have the satisfaction of capturing him and he’ll become a beacon for the freedom fighters. He pulls the trigger. He falls to the ground. He pulls out the photograph of Jeon Seol. He says “I miss you.” A tear rolls down his faces as he dies.

Jin O (Ko Gyung Pyo) sits in his room, not answering when a servant, tells him a package has come for him. He leaves the package.

You must know, as I do, what is in the package. Awk! Tears!


Jin O opens the box. Awk! Tears! Inside is Se Joo’s typewriter, his gold pocket watch, and a note. Jin O opens the note.

"Are you alive? I was cleaning up before leaving for Manchuria and decided to send my three most precious things to you to keep for me. Do you remember the first day we saw the typewriter together? I didn't mean it when I said my pen was sufficient. After receiving the gift of the typewriter from you, I was so happy. I've received more from you than I can replay in this lifetime. Now at the point that I may not see you again, I'm sorry this is all I can give you. And they aren't even free, I need one more favor. Will you help?"

Jin O pulls out an envelope.

You must know, as I do, what is in the envelope. Awk! Tears!

"I'm hoping you'll finish my novel for me. Use the typewriter you gave me. Please write our story in my place. The story of us living on this land in this time. We lived diligently in this dark reality. We hurt and hoped, together. But we found happiness, together. We loved and fought with all our might, together. The pocket watch is for you. Please cherish Jeon Seol every minute you have together. Never let her be alone and stay be her side. Finally, I trusted you and loved our friendship. I am sorry I never told you. Let's make sure we meet again alive. No, let's meet again in our death. If a god asks if I was happy in this life, I will say I was happy because of you and Jeon Seol. If a god compliments me on my life, I'll ask for a favor, if I'm reincarnated, I'll ask to be with you guys again."

I had to take a minute to gather my composure. Goodness, that was touching and beautifully written. I can see the basis for this series, their friendship has always been the key.

Present… Tae Min drives reeling from what happened. He saw Se Joo fall off the rooftop. He saw Se Joo suspended in air then lowered to the ground. He saw Jin O exit Se Joo’s body. He saw himself drive into Jin O as he fled the scene. He knows he killed a man.

Jeon Seol (Lim Soo Jung) is surprised when Jin O tells her that Tae Min ordered the blackmailer to kidnap her. Jin O says that after an argument between Se Joo and Tae Min, Se Joo fell from the roof top. Jin O says he saved Se Joo by possessing his body but none the less, the impact had to cause injuries. Jeon Seol rushes to explain the situation to the doctors.

Jeon Seol explains how the accident happened to a stunned Publisher Gal Ji Seok (Jo Woo Jin) and Secretary Kang. Jeon Seol presses them to explain what happened so the proper tests can be run. Se Joo pulls the curtain back and stands with effort. He tells Publisher Gal and Secretary Kang that a ghost possessed his body and saved him from dying upon impact.


Tae Min finds his passport. He’s stunned to find Jin O in his office. He’s dead, how can he be there? Jin O says Tae Min looks like he’s seen a ghost. Can’t he believe that he survived being run over by Tae Min’s car? Tae Min recognizes Jin O from the night he drunkenly went to Se Joo’s house to beg for the first draft of Fate. Tae Min demands to know who Jin O is. Jin O says that’s the wrong question. He says Tae Min should be asking Se Joo, who he pushed off the rooftop, is alive. Tae Min declares he didn’t push Se Joo, he fell. Tae Min claims it was an accident. Jin O points out that Tae Min left Se Joo for dead. Tae Min claims he was scared and worried he would be blamed. Jin O asks if running him over was an accident or intentional. Tae Min won’t answer. Jin O walks towards him and says he tried to kill two people. Tae Min says there is no evidence. Jin O shakes his head and says he hasn’t changed one bit. The pattern remains – commit a crime, cover it up with another crime, with no remorse only excuses. Jin O grabs him and says Tae Min doesn’t know anything about remorse. Jin O flashes back to the past, grabbing Tae Min in the interrogation room. Tae Min pushes him aside and runs. As he opens the door, two police detectives are there. Yes! They arrest him for conspiring to kidnap Jeon Seol. Yes! Jin O watches and feels pain.

As they enter Se Joo’s house, Publisher Gal complains that Se Joo shouldn’t have left the hospital. Se Joo counters he has no broken bones and no concussion. Se Joo tells Publisher Gal to stop over protecting him. Jeon Seol sags with the weight of the day. Se Joo is instantly by her side. Se Joo demands they hospitalize Jeon Seol immediately. Publisher Gal quips the Se Joo is the overprotective one.  Ha!

Jeon Seol and Se Joo end up side by side in the bedroom, both sporting IVs. Jeon Seol is sorry that she put Se Joo in danger but she’s happy Jin O saved him. Se Joo agrees Jin O saved his life. Jin O appears and asks if Se Joo is okay. Se Joo confirms this. Se Joo asks if his flickering has subsided. Jeon Seol does not understand that statement.

Jin O and Jeon Seol are surprised when Se Joo declares he remembers all of his past life. He asks if they are interested. They are!


Later Se Joo wonders if he should withhold the truth about the past. When Jeon Seol enters his bedroom, she asks who she shot in the past. Se Joo tells her not to worry about it. If she remembers, she remembers. If she doesn’t, then forget it. Se Joo tells Jeon Seol that his past persona prayed that he be united with Jeon Seol and Jin O in their next life. Se Joo smiles. That wish was granted. Jeon Seol smiles. She gives him a sweet peck on his lips.

Jin O sees the crack in his skin is longer. He remembers the past encounter with Tae Min. He wonders if he was the one that caught Tae Min not vice versa. He wonders how he died.

Tae Min’s mother and father visit him. His mother can’t believe her precious child is being accused like this. Tae Min’s father says the police have evidence. Tae Min’s mother refutes the validity of the evidence.  Tae Min tells them to be quiet. Tae Min’s mother continues to spin her lies. Tae Min stands and yells are his mother. He tells her to stop whining. He tells her she suffocated him. She’s stunned. Tae Min’s father sends her out of the room. Tae Min’s father asks why he did this. Tae Min tells his father he ran over a person, but it wasn’t a person, but it was a ghost. He tells his father that Se Joo would know who the ghost is.

As they shop at the grocery, Chef Ricardo can’t believe it when Bang Jin tells him that the blackmailer became a waitress at the restaurant to spy on Jeon Seol.  When he steps away to grab an item, Bang Jin spies Jeon Seol’s mother. She snaps a photo and texts it to her friend.


Publisher Gal finds Se Joo and Jeon Seol sleeping close together. He trips and falls. They wake. They are startled to see they are that close. Jeon Seol sits up confused why she’s there. Se Joo asks why she stayed last night. She reminds him he asked her to stay after talking all night. She says he was the one that crawled in her bed. He doesn’t like how she put that. Publisher Gal sits up startling both of them. He asks if they want to get their compatibility checked.  Jeon Seol phone gets the text from BJ. She leaves.

Jeon Seol meets her mother and tells her to share what she knows about the past. Her mother hedges and asks what Jeon Seol knows. Jeon Seol says she knows her mother was a traitor. She knows she was caught after the mission. Her mother says remembering everything isn’t needed. Jeon Seol says that her past persona isn’t her, nor was she her mother’s past persona’s daughter. Jeon Seol believes that her past persona couldn’t forgive her. Jeon Seol says she can’t forgive being left behind when she was a young girl. She asks her mother to share the good and bad memories, so they can be released from them.

Se Joo finds Jin O deep in thought. Jin O shares not knowing how he died is frustrating. Se Joo asks why he needs to know. Jin O asks if Se Joo knows something. Se Joo says he doesn’t know. Jin O asks if Se Joo remembers more than he pretended to be the freedom fighters’ leader. Se Joo wonders if Jin O can handle the truth.


Jeon Seol returns to Se Joo’s house and overhears Se Joo tell Jin O that to save Jeon Seol he surrendered to the police. Se Joo tells Se Joo from this point forward he can only deduce what happened before he does not have firsthand knowledge. Jin O wants to hear his opinions. Se Joo says that Jin O couldn’t stand Jeon Seol being in danger and had no power to help her. Jin O can’t believe that Se Joo is implying he told the police who the freedom fighter leader was. Se Joo states the police launched a surprise attack on the freedom fighter safe house before they left the city. Jin O declares Madame provided the location information. Se Joo counters that only Jin O knew the safe house location. Se Joo reminds him these are only opinions, not hard facts. Jin O says the person that kill him was…and Jeon Seol enters the room saying she killed Jin O. She says her mother helped her remember.

1930… Jeon Seol sits alone in the interrogation room. She’s told she has been released. Jin O’s father’s servant gives her money and clothes and tells her to forget what happened. He tells her to leave the city.  She sits there without saying a word. The man snaps that Jin O worked hard to get her released.

Jeon Seol stand in front of the Carpe Diem which is boarded shut. She sees a newspaper which announces Se Joo’s suicide and that he was the freedom fighter leader. She gets a determined look in her eye.

Jeon Seol retrieves a machine gun from the hidden stash. She recalls telling Se Joo the gun was called Chicago Typewriter because it sounds like a typewriter when it fires.

Jin O sits in his home, stares at the typewriter Se Joo left him and thinks about his words. He puts in a piece of paper and begins to complete the story as Se Joo requested.


Tae Min announces that Carpe Diem is now the official bar for the police of the Japanese empire. Tae Min toast the assembled Japanese official and supports. Jeon Seol bursts in the room, with a mask, and begins firing. She doesn’t miss and mows down many of the assembled. Tae Min hides behind the bar. He picks up a pistol. When he stands to shot her, she’s gone. But she’s not gone. She puts a gun to his head. Tae Min says that a gun is an unladylike accessory. He tells her to put it down. Jeon Seol tells him to put his gun down. He puts the weapon on the bar. He promises that he can help her. The thought disgusts her. Tae Min chuckles and declares she sounds just like Se Joo did before he killed himself. Jeon Seol shots Tae Min in the head. Yes! Give that woman a medal of honor! She stares at Tae Min’s dead body and declares for the freedom fighters; the puppet of their enemy is dead.

That was completely awesome! Tae Min got what he deserved. Jeon Seol delivered justice.

Jin O’s servant tells him there is a lone avenger lose. He explains the machine gun mow down of the previous day.  Jin O learns that Tae Min was killed. He’s told the police are searching high and low for the avenger.

Jin O goes to Carpe Diem. He sees the remnants of the previous day. He goes to the hidden stash and finds all the weapon are gone. He knows that Jeon Seol is the avenger. He knows she’ll come for him.


Madame walks the street worried about the avenger.  A carriage stops in beside her. A gun is pointed at her. Jeon Seol reminds the startled Madam that she once claimed love was forbidden for freedom fighters. Jeon Seol says that betrayers have a pay a price. Madame admits she was foolish to believe Tae Min would keep his promise and release her son from prison. Jeon Seol tells her she hopes they can be better situated in their next life. Madam pleads. Jeon Seol declares for the freedom fighters, their traitor will now be killed. Jeon Seol shots Madame dead.


Jin O types the story on the typewriter. Jeon Seol enters and puts the gun to his head. He turns and says that Se Joo left them gifts. Jin O tells Jeon Seol she should have the gold pocket watch. Jeon Seol asks why Jin O did it. Jin O calmly says the watch is hers, now she should end things quickly. Livid, she asks why he did it. Jin O replies that he couldn’t watch her die. With tears running down her face, Jeon Seol declares that she was nothing in the overall footprint of the freedom fighters. She screams that he never should have told the police who the leader was. Jin O yells her name. He calmly tells her to end things quickly. He reminds her of the code of the organization. Jeon Seol says the code requires this. Her hand shakes. Jin O comments that her hand is shaking. Awk! Tears! He steadies her hand just like he did when he taught her to shoot. He aims the pistol at himself. He tells her not to hesitate in front of a target. He tells her to do it. He says he’ll do it if she won’t. She gathers herself and stares at him. He is satisfied that her focus is back. He releases his hold on the pistol, he turns his back to her. Jeon Seol asks if he has any last words. Jin O tells her to kill him to give him piece of mind. Jeon Seol states for the freedom fighters, their traitor will now be killed. She kills Jin O. He falls on top of the typewriter. With his dying moments, he tells Se Joo that he made Jeon Seol cry. He knows he failed Se Joo’s request to keep her safe. He apologizes for that and not finishing the novel. He promises if they are together in the next life, he’ll keep his promises then. He promises to do everything to protect their happiness. Jeon Seol sobs with the agony of it all.


Jeon Seol walks alone with a gun in one hand and Se Joo’s pocket watch in the other. She sits by a tree. Se Joo’s ghost walks up to her. He touches her face. She looks at him. She’s happy he came. Se Joo reminds her he promised he’d come again. She admits she killed Jin O. She says that he was an older brother, father, friend, and comrade. She cries that by killing him she disgraced him and what he did for her. She declares she was the reason both of them died. She sobs her pain. Se Joo wipes away her tears and tells her she’s wrong. She asks if he’s going to leave her. Se Joo says he must leave and she must live with purpose. She wants to go with him. He tells her she must live to see an independent Korea. She’s exhausted and wants to sleep. She falls asleep. She drops the pocket watch. Time and weather cover the pocket watch.

Good grief, I’m emotionally drained from all the tears. Beautiful in its sorrow and perfectly portrayed.

Years later… Jeon Seol’s father finds the pocket watch. He says he’ll give it to his daughter.

Present… The three of them absorb the past.

Jin O remembers giving up Se Joo as the freedom fighter leader. He asks Se Joo if his betrayal lead to his death by Tae Min. Se Joo reminds him the past is done. Jin O asks Jeon Seol if he put blood on her hands by forcing her to kill him. Jeon Seol apologizes for killing him. Jin O says he was the one that started the chain of events that killed both of them. Jin O glows and falls to the floor. Se Joo and Jeon Seol call to him.


Bang Wool arrives at Jeon Seol’s request. Bang Wool can’t see Jin O lying on the bed. Jeon Seol describe the light emanating from Jin O that caused him to collapse. Jeon Seol says he experienced a shock. Bang Wool states Jin O will soon dissolve. She says there is no promise of a future life. Bang Wool states she warned Jin O to conserve his energy. Se Joo asks if they can reverse the situation. Bang Wool states even if all the energy were restored, the crack is still there. Bang Wool tells them to grant Jin O’s last wishes.

Se Joo tries to come to grips with the situation. Jin O follows him. He asks Se Joo to have a beer with him. Se Joo is not happy that Jin O kept this from him. Jin O counters that Se Joo didn’t tell him that he was a traitor. Jin O touches the typewriter and says he’s happy to know why he sealed himself in it. Se Joo asks what the reason was. Jin O says it was his way to beg forgiveness from Se Joo and Jeon Seol. Jin O says he needed to keep the promise to give up Jeon Seol in their next lifetime. Awk! Tears! Jin O says his plan to bring them together through the shaggy dog worked. Se Joo chuckles. Jin O says that giving up Jeon Seol is sad but has made him determined to meet new women in his next life. Se Joo laughs. Se Joo assures Jin O that his past persona didn’t resent him for what he had to do and his trust never wavered. Forgiveness was granted long ago. Se Joo says he has nothing to forgive Jin O for in this lifetime. Se Joo tells him to forget blame and find a way to stop from disappearing. Jin O asks Se Joo to let him use the writer’s lair. Awk! Tears! He wants to finish the novel, Chicago Typewriter.


Jin O thanks Jeon Seol for telling him the details he couldn’t remember. He states he’ll finish the novel now. Jeon Seol apologizes for causing Jin O to suffer. Jin O absolves her of her past actions. He tells her to live life. She asks him to realize his betrayal was done to save her. She says her past persona realized that and felt gratitude and sorrow towards him. She tells him that he was a respected teacher, trusted comrade, and loving brother. She wasn’t lonely because of him. She enjoyed her life as a sniper because of him. She thanks him for liking her. She cries. Jin O touches her hair.

Lovely moment between them.

Se Joo watches Jin O type and knows he’s expending precious energy to do this.

The next morning Writer Baek calls. He asks him to meet Tae Min who is saying odd things.


Se Joo meets Tae Min in the visitor room. Se Joo says he’s glad he didn’t get hurt badly or Tae Min would be in worse trouble. Tae Min asks who was the man he ran over, the man that was in Se Joo’s writing lair. He demands to know if he’s human. He gets agitated as he describes the man appearing in his dream demanding that he admit to wrongdoings he didn’t commit. Se Joo asks why Tae Min can’t admit his wrong doings. Se Joo asks why Tae Min can’t say “I’m sorry”. Se Joo tells Tae Min he must admit to his wrongdoing even if it is humiliating. Se Joo tells him to atone for his sins so he can restart his life. Se Joo leaves.

When Se Joo returns he calls to Jin O. He’s not in the writer’s lair. Jin O appears with a beer in hand. He smiles the novel is done. They enjoy a beer together. Se Joo says that Jin O has kept all his promises. Jin O is pleased. Se Joo reminds him there are other promises to keep. He hands Jin O the writer’s contract. Jin O says it would take multiple lifetimes to keep all the promises in the thick document. Se Joo says he only cares about the first item, until the novel is done they live together to share joy and pain. Se Joo says the novel is done, but the novel about the two of them isn’t finished yet. Se Joo warns him not to leave. Jin O smiles. Se Joo says that novel is his next project.


Se Joo finishes writing the novel. Jin O is pleased. Se Joo is exhausted. Jin O asks to read it. Se Joo considered trapping Jin O in his novel so he could not dissipate to nothing. He asks Jin O to promise to stay until the novel is published so they can have a chance to meet again in their next lifetime. Jin O glows. Se Joo tells him to follow him.

 
Se Joo, Jeon Seol, and Jin O fish together. Jin O remembers that he wanted to fish in an independent Korea. Jeon Seol asks if they want to bet whether Jin O will have another life with them. All three of them bet that Jin O will be reborn. They all chuckle. Jin O feels the pull of the other side.  Se Joo thanks Jin O for bring Jeon Seol into his life. Jeon Seol leaves to get bait. Se Joo tells Jin O that he helped break down the walls that Se Joo had erected around himself. When he glances at Jin O, he’s gone. He asks Jin O if he’s still there. He asks for a signal. Nothing happens. When Jeon Seol returns she knows what has happened. Se Joo calls to Jin O to return. Jeon Seol hugs him. They cry together.  Jeon Seol sees the bait bob. She smiles. He smiles. They know Se Joo will be with them in the next life.

 
At the book introduction Se Joo says “He was my muse and ghost. He traveled 80 years to help me when I faltered. He was my friend.  The typewriter and his friendship allowed me to live in this life.” Se Joo holds up the novel Chicago Typewriter and dedicates it to his friend Jin O. Everyone is there and smiles. Jeon Seol gives Se Joo a thumb up.


Jeon Seol and Se Joo stroll hand in hand after the book signing. She admits she feels guilty for being so happy. She trips on her untied shoe laces. She wonders who could be missing her that her shoe laces untied. Se Joo ties her shoe. He says one person from years ago is missing her because he’s tied by the rope of fate. Jeon Seol asks what Se Joo thinks happened to Jin O. Se Joo hopes that Jin O is settled in his novel. Jeon Seol wonders if Jin O is happy. Se Joo suggest they flip a coin to find out. The coin indicates the Jin O is safely settled in the novel.


We see past Se Joo refuse to show Jeon Seol his novel. She wants to know the ending. He tells her to buy it and find out. She calls him petty. Jin O enters the room. They ask him where he’s been. Jin O says he’s been dreaming. Se Joo comments it must be nice to nap during the day. Jeon Seol says they won’t liberate the country by dreaming during the day. Jin O assures them that liberation will come. Se Joo asks what Jin O dreamed about. Jin O says he dreamed they lived together in an independent Korea.


Jin O pulls out the picture of the three of them. Now he appears in the photo. He hopes they’ll be together again.

My Thoughts

Satisfying final episode. Writer Jin pulled my heart strings consistently throughout this episode. The past was resolved, the present was resolved, the promise of the future was made. In the end Chicago Typewriter was about the power of friendship. Our character’s individual and collective love for each other allowed them to push, prod, save, and enjoy each other. The fact that both men loved the same woman wasn’t a sticking point. With honor and kindness, they dealt with that reality.

Because Writer Jin spent so much time in the past in the final two episodes, the closure of the show with Jin O settled in the past in Se Joo’s novel was the perfect ending.

I enjoyed Chicago Typewriter for tapping into history, for having honor and friendship as its primary focus. This wasn’t a romance between a man and woman. It was a romance between three friends. All three actors hit their marks gave performances that drove this show forward.

Could I quibble about Chicago Typewriter? Yes, I could but I won’t. I’m pleased and satisfied with the final arc of this show. Writer Jin delved into the past and answered every question. Our threesome will be together again in their next lifetime, I have no doubt.

Jin O’s (Ko Gyung Pyo) ending was more than I expected. His story was richer than I imagined. He choices and the ripple effects were key components. Se Joo and Jeon Seol loved him and let him know it. Their absolution of his actions was touching. Initially Jin O was the annoying ghost but in the end, he was the loved and trusted friend.

Jeon Seol (Lim Soo Jung) had the hardest road to walk in the past. Living through Se Joo’s death, then killing the traitors, and finally taking Jin O’s life with his blessing was draining. Her internal fortitude was impressive. She survived the torture. She never would have cracked. Present day Jeon Seol was gentler and less sure of herself. But she had wisdom, warmth, and willingness to look beyond others actions.

Han Se Joo (Yoo Ah In) was the key character of the series yet without Jeon Seol and Jin O the story would not have succeeded. Hidden behind a physical and emotional wall, Se Joo was brought from the brink by Jeon Seol and Jin O and he wasn’t always gracious about it. Se Joo’s sensitivity to knowing the Jin O liked Jeon Seol was a mark of true friendship. The fact that he did this in the past was a measure of a man. Se Joo’s passion was attractive and compelling. Yet he had an ability to empathize and forgive. Yoo Ah In’s portrayal of Se Joo totally worked. He is now added to “my men” the list of actors I will always watch.

How did I do on my wish list?

* I don’t need to see any more of the past characters. Their story is complete. DENIED – How wrong I was to wish that. There was much more to be told and it was emotionally riveting.

* Tae Min can expire and I’m okay with that. GRANTED – Tae Min died in the past and ended in prison in the present.

* While I’d love Jin O to evade vanishing, I don’t believe that as possible. I’d like his final act to be one of friendship. It could involve saving his friends from Tae Min. It could involve him watching them from heaving and smiling. GRANTED – As Se Joo hoped, Jin O is settled in the novel Chicago Typewriter waiting for the next lifetime when they will all be joined again.

* Jeon Seol and Se Joo need admit that they love each other. Their past counterparts managed to finally admit their feelings. It’s their turn. I won’t mind a tinge of passion between these two. Their past counterparts delivered passion with their kiss. It’s time for the present Jeon Seol and Se Joo to do the same. DENIED and GRANTED – The passion in the present was never explored but they forge their path together. In the end, this is irrelevant. This love for each other is there, but Chicago Typewriter wasn’t about romance, it was about friendship.

The OST was compact but powerful. I was like Pavlov’s dog in the final two episodes and started crying as soon as “Writing Our Stories” played underlying the touching moments. Check out the OST’s playlist:

 

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Posted in Chicago Typewriter, Recaps
41 comments on “Chicago Typewriter Episode 16 (Final) Recap
  1. swati says:

    Hi,

    Are u going to watch the series Bride of the water god coming in 1st week of July??

    It has Baek Ah of Scarlet Heart Ryeo. Not sure if it will be good but I m just curious about the show.

    Let me know.

  2. studiomarie says:

    I watched both 15 and 16 together. I ran out of tissues halfway through 16. I haven’t cried this hard since Goblin. Thanks again for another great recap.

  3. Beez says:

    Kjt, you did a great job getting this down in a recap. And I so agree about the friendships. I love that these two men could love the same woman and yet there are no cracks in their friendship. In fact, understanding that love is why Past Se Ju could accept the betrayal by Past Yoo jin. He understood, because he even betrayed himself – his own code to abandon comrades in honor of continuing the fight.

    Here were my thoughts as I watched:

    This show could’ve ended at Past Se ju’s death confession/letter to Yoo jin and I’d have felt satisfied. So good. (I’m glad it did go on, but at the moment, I was done…just done. )

    Ko Gyung-Pyo was SO VERY good reading Se ju’s letter.

    If I believed in past lives, I appreciate the parallels in this show that Present Se ju feels betrayed by those closest to him but it’s as if that’s his destiny – to be betrayed. Or you can look at it as, he needed to feel that betrayal in his current life to understand what the betrayal by Past Yoo jin cost Yoo jin. It was not the same as the evil, selfish betrayal by Tae min and his mother nor the passive betrayal by Tae min’s dad.

    Past Seoul going around executing traitors – STUFF JUST GOT REAL Y’ALL! They certainly didn’t shy away from the fact that Past Seoul was an assassin and they allowed us to see her in full action. Which makes sense so that we can understand her commitment and why she musn’t falter when she faced Past Yoo jin.

    Something about that dreadfully beautiful half-dead half-alive tree that Past Seoul chooses to rest under is so fitting to our story.

    What was up with the foundation makeup for Past Seo ju and Past Seoul – was that supposed to illuminate them as if they were spectres of the past? That would’ve worked for me but I think they didn’t get the lighting quite right for the effect.

    I am so pleased that this drama had such a satisfying ending, something most Kdramas, no matter how good they are, they seem to have difficulty producing. Most fizzle out but this went out with a bang. Like a 12 course meal where you think you’re full until the waiter appears with a decadent dessert that somehow, suddenly, you have more than enough room for.

    I also felt it’s one of the few times just the right balance was struck when a show mixes rom-com and serious drama.

    Chicago Typewriter will take it’s place along side Healer in my list of contemporary favs. Good romance AND great story!

    I have no quibbles. *Will wonders never cease?!!*

    • I have no quibbles. *Will wonders never cease?!!*
      I lived to see the day and am glad it was with this series. Thank you for watching, reading, and commenting throughout Beez.

      In fact, understanding that love is why Past Se Ju could accept the betrayal by Past Yoo jin. He understood, because he even betrayed himself – his own code to abandon comrades in honor of continuing the fight
      Terrific insight.

      parallels in this show that Present Se ju feels betrayed by those closest to him but it’s as if that’s his destiny – to be betrayed. Or you can look at it as, he needed to feel that betrayal in his current life to understand what the betrayal by Past Yoo jin cost Yoo jin
      That’s another great insight. I you want to write a review, let me know. You’ve got this show nailed.

      They certainly didn’t shy away from the fact that Past Seoul was an assassin and they allowed us to see her in full action
      I appreciated that we did get to see her skills. Typically (at least in my mind) a sniper is far away from their target but she took (and had to) to the up close and personal approach which only made her actions more impactful to watch. That met my inner blood lust need.

      dreadfully beautiful half-dead half-alive tree that Past Seoul chooses to rest under is so fitting to our story
      Another nuance that you just illuminated for me.

      I also felt it’s one of the few times just the right balance was struck when a show mixes rom-com and serious drama.
      The last quarter of the series jettisoned the rom-com aspect and it only strengthened the story. I almost forgot about that aspect of the show, the past was so compelling.

      Chicago Typewriter will take it’s place along side Healer in my list of contemporary favs. Good romance AND great story!
      It was a good but not great romance. It was a great story. My quibble is the pacing issues that gave a lull in the drama and the slow dispersal of the past. That being said, when the final push of a drama grabs me like that, all is forgiven.

      • Beez says:

        @kjt – I think that if Seoul hadn’t blocked Se ju’s attempt at just one more “sacrifice for my country” while they were sitting on the bed that you might feel differently about the current-day romance. lol

        But you know how this works, kjt. The moment they let us have that bone-melting, knee buckling kiss in the past, they used up the K-quota on passionate kisses. 🤣

  4. Beez says:

    btw,I’d love to review this but not just yet. I’d like to rewatch it, knowing what we now know about Yoo jin being an actual ghost as opposed to how we were wondering in the earlier episodes. So I’d like to come back a while later (similar to how you do your series reviews a while after the show has concluded) if the offer will still stand by the time I feel I’m ready? I’d like to re-walk on this journey again with these friends and see where the writer took us. I’d like to watch closely the scenes where we thought we saw people talking and interacting with Jin Oh and see how the writer/ director pulled that off. And I’d like to be more invested in the present day because I did fixate on the past. It was like somebody was letting me have my chocolate chocolate chip Haagen Daaz but only feeding me two teaspoons at a time so I wasn’t necessarily appreciating the bowl of butter pecan I was eating as I anxiously waited for the HD again.

    I want to savor everything about it *sigh* That’s a good sigh. A very good sigh.)

    • No time frames on a review, whenever it works for you. I’m finding I’ll either immediately review, ponder then review, or never review. I’m trying to stop the latter. The longer I get away from a series, the harder it is to write the review.

      • Beez says:

        I get it, because you’ve got so many to recap & review.

        I just know this is one that’ll stay with me for a long time. I’ll probably rewatch it over and over the way I did Healer. I spotted something in Healer that made me in awe of that writer and I checked the comments on Dramabeans and elsewhere to see if anyone else caught it, but out of the over 3,000 comments there, I saw no one else talking about it. And unfortunately, because I didn’t watch Healer when it aired, but marathoned it later, the threads were abandoned and there was no one I could discuss my observation with. 😕

        Based in How rich this story is, I hope to find similar hidden insights with this writer’s script.

  5. Beez says:

    Boy oh boy – swypos. I swear I proofed it but the darn auto-correct.

    “signify” should’ve been “somebody”. (It keeps changing it to “signify” even now. grrrrr)

    And the last line – “I want to savor everything about it.”

  6. Jane Tilly says:

    BETRAYAL & DEATH – I wept 😢 and was distraught with Se Joo’s and Jin Oh’s deaths ⚰. I was in disbelief that 1930s Se Joo could function after having shot 🔫 himself in the head enough to find and gaze at Seol’s picture 🖼 while he pondered about his friends…I know, it was a turn off your brain moment.

    The letter 💌 Se Joo left Jin Oh was heart 💓 🔧-ing, especially in light of Jin Oh’s choice to betray his friend in lieu of watching Seol being shot 🔫 on the spot ⚫. It was as if Se Joo knew once Jin Oh turned himself in to bargain for Seol’s life, betrayal was inevitable. It was a relief when later modern Se Joo informed Jin Oh that Hwi Young already forgave Jin Oh. Jin Oh knew Seol didn’t stand a chance of surviving 🔫, while Se Joo did have a chance of surviving. It would have been a hard choice; I wish Jin Oh had not put himself in the position to make that choice.

    I was saddened Seol, despite her struggle, chose to follow the freedom fighters code, executed Jin Oh, who expected no less. As Beez said, the “dreadfully beautiful half-dead half-alive tree that Past Seoul chooses to rest under” 🌳 when she had finished carrying out justice for the freedom 🇰🇷 fighters was very poetic.

    MATERNAL INSTINCTS – I find it curious Seol’s mom abandoned her as a child 👨‍👩‍👧 (6 yoa?) due to her prior life. How could moms know her child was the teenager turned adult assassin 🔫 in the prior life, did she have shamanistic 🔮 powers? Moms could not have recognized her 6 year old daughter as the person who executed her in the 1930s. You would think Seol would have to be closer in age to the teenager who entered Carpe Diem as an errand boy. How could Seol’s mother think Seol would repeat being an assassin 🔫 in the modern day? After Seol regained her memories I about choked 😅 when she told Jin Oh “Thanks to you I could live a wonderful life as a sniper”. It just struck me as funny 😆‼

    IMPENITENT TAE MIN – Past and present Tae Min are both rotten to the core 🍎‼ I wish it wasn’t Seol that put a bullet 🔫 in Tae Min’s head in the past, although someone needed to do the job. Present Tae Min didn’t even bother to ✔ on Se Joo, whether having Se Joo go off the roof was deliberate or an accident and then proceeded to slam 🚘 into Jin Oh with about stopping or thinking twice! When confronted by Jin Oh he replied “Do you have evidence?” NO REMORSE whatsoever! 😡😤😠

    I was thrilled 🙃 to have the 👮 haul his butt 🍑 off to jail. I loved that Se Joo did not respond to Tae Min’s request to find out who Jin 👻 Oh was, while Tae Min continues to insist “I didn’t do anything THAT wrong”. Oh Tae Min, you’ll have a lot of time ⏰ to think about your wrongdoings​ and wonder about Jin Oh’s 👻 identity in you long stint in jail 🔒🚔. I cheered 📣 when Tae Min yelled 🗣 at his mother, telling her that she suffocated him. Color 🖍 me 🎊surprised🎉 he didn’t blame all his choices on his mother. I was glad to see the last of the Baek family…GOOD RIDDANCE‼‼‼ 🙋

    DEARTH OF DESIRE – I was 🎊 surprised 🎉 I was satisfied with the lack of a full blown romance 💋💏💕. As KJT said in the end a romance 💗 between Seol and Se Joo was “irrelevant”. It was all about the friendship of the trio 👨👩👨 of compatriots 🇰🇷. I agree with Beez it was amazing the friendship of the trio 👨👩👨 did not suffer any fissures despite both men being in love with Seol.

    I laughed 😆 when Publisher Gal discovered Seol and Se Joo in the same bed 🛌, fully clothed I might add. It was quite humorous 😅 when Publisher Gal made his presence known. Later in the episode I 💗-ed Se Joo flirting with Seol with the “sacrifice for my country” 🇰🇷. I think 🤔 Beez may be right about the past couple 💏 using up all the Kdrama allowable passionate 💋💕💋 kisses…too bad.

    FINAL OUTCOME – It was interesting to find out Jin Oh sealed himself in the typewriter to keep his promise to write 📝 the book 📗 and atone for his betrayal. I was please Jin Oh’s soul/spirit 👻 did not dissipate and Jin Oh’s spirit 👻 was able to be stored in the novel 📗. I wondered if Jin Oh was really stored in the novel 📗 or did he go back to the 1930s? Was this ending like Dallas with Jin Oh instead of Bobby waking up from a dream 💭? Does this mean Jin Oh could mitigate the trio’s 👨👩👨 untimely deaths 💀?

    Chicago Typewriter finish with an unexpected, strong 💪🙄 and rich 💰 ending focusing on the past. I enjoyed the OST, the 1930s 🎵🎶musical🎶🎵 number was a great addition to give a flavor of the past.

    This was an enjoyable series and once again KJT, I appreciate you taking the time to recap and comment this series… THANK YOU‼‼‼😄

    • Beez says:

      @Jane Tilly -I think 6-year old Seoul was constantly recounting her past life to her mom and that’s how mom knew. I think they said Seoul remembered a lot more before she went to live with shaman lady but had since forgotten the past memories because she had new trauma attached to it because of mom leaving and the disruption the past memories caused her so she repressed them.

      I disagree that there was no romance in the present day. It’s just we’re so used to romance = opposition, love triangles, noble idiocy, and stupid time jumps that the present romance seemed muted. Afterall, we have our couple getting i.v.’s in bed and, waking up in bed together, sans i.v.’s. In Kdrama interpretation – full blown couple cohabitation!

      But I think the point the show is making (or that I’m reading into it) is, the freedom fighters accomplished what they set out to so that Present Seoul and Seju (and couples like them) are free to love ❤relatively stress free (as long as they don’t have chaebol in laws 😉)

      • Jane Tilly says:

        Beez, you’re right about Seol recounting her past life to her mom when she was young, but I thought she didn’t have assassin memories until she held a gun 🔫, which would have been when she was training to be a marksman 🔘, which I would have assumed was not until she was a teenager.

        I wasn’t very clear when discussing romance 💋💕 of our OTP. It is not that I didn’t see romance 💗 in the modern OTP, but the modern couple didn’t seem to be as passionate 💋💕 as the 1930s OTP. Since the focus was friendship, I found myself surprisingly satisfied with the amount of romance in this story

        I do agree that the point of the series was comradery and appreciation for the sacrifices of the 1930s freedom fighters that paved the way for contemporary Koreans 🇰🇷 have so much freedom. You made me laugh 😄 out loud at “Present Seoul and Seju (and couples like them) are free to love ❤relatively stress free (as long as they don’t have chaebol in laws 😉)”. Oh those chaebol in-laws will get 🎯 you everytime‼

      • Beez says:

        @Jane Tilly – As you say, Seoul didn’t have to remember the killings yet, but mom may have remembered everything before Seoul did so she bailed. Still SMH over that one. Alllllthough, if she vividly remembers badazz efficient assassin Past Seoul putting her down like a dog with a bullet to the brain…ummmm First time I ever thought parent abandonment of a child might be a litttttt-tle bit justified. lol

      • Jane Tilly says:

        You know how to crack 😆 me 🆙 Beez❣‼❣

      • Beez says:

        @Jane Tilly – I crack myself up too!😃 But my family thinks I’m cuckoo. 🍌🍌

      • But I think the point the show is making (or that I’m reading into it) is, the freedom fighters accomplished what they set out to so that Present Seoul and Seju (and couples like them) are free to love ❤relatively stress free
        Perfectly put!

    • I was in disbelief that 1930s Se Joo could function after having shot 🔫 himself in the head enough to find and gaze at Seol’s picture 🖼 while he pondered about his friends…I know, it was a turn off your brain moment.
      Good point. I was so taken with the moment (or was that Yoo Ah In), I didn’t even notice.

      Past and present Tae Min are both rotten to the core 🍎‼
      Agreed. He didn’t have a mustache to twirl with evil intent, but he was a selfish unstable violent man without ethics, just like his mother.

      I loved that Se Joo did not respond to Tae Min’s request to find out who Jin 👻 Oh was
      That made me happy too. Se Joo did not get drawn into Tae Min’s mess. He observed, advised, and left it behind him.

      I was 🎊 surprised 🎉 I was satisfied with the lack of a full blown romance 💋💏💕
      The past couple had beautiful aching longing between them. The present couple had sweet acceptance of each other with the intent to travel life’s path together. Both were worth watching. Upon reflection, Writer Jin was clever NOT to make the two relationships parallel. Each walked very different paths.

      I wondered if Jin Oh was really stored in the novel 📗 or did he go back to the 1930s? Was this ending like Dallas with Jin Oh instead of Bobby waking up from a dream 💭?
      I had to chuckle at the Dallas reference Bobby’s dream reference. Why? Because I had a similar reaction, was this whole series just a dream? I lean towards literal interpretations, so I accepted Seo Joo’s explanation that Jin Oh was in his novel. That created a full circle moment for our trio, living in the novel they lived and documented together.

      Chicago Typewriter finish with an unexpected, strong 💪🙄 and rich 💰 ending focusing on the past.
      Truly, I almost found the present day characters irrelevant as the past characters’ final arc was so strong.

      This was an enjoyable series and once again KJT, I appreciate you taking the time to recap and comment this series
      Writer Jin’s dialogue was rich. I tried to elevate my own writing to do it justice. That was fun. Thank you for watching and commenting throughout. This series and Beez has convinced me that Yoo Ah In belongs in the list of actors I will watch.

      • Beez says:

        I thought the same about Past Seju’s head shot but brushed that logical thought away by telling myself that he had one of those not dead center shots. You know how every now and then you hear of those weird ER patients who survive an ax embedded in their head, etc. 🤔

        “…so I accepted Seo Joo’s explanation that Jin Oh was in his novel.” kjt

        I’m taking it both ways, literally (because we know Jin O can be entrapped in inanimate objects) but I’m leaning more toward symbolically because, the legend goes that ghosts are trapped because of blood and trauma in inanimate objects (thanks Goblin) it’s seems more likely to me that it’s about Jin O lives on because the novel will be read by hundreds of thousands of S. Koreans and he and the young purple who sacrificed for freedom will be remembered.

        kjt, so glad I have somebody else to enjoy that “thing” (that I don’t know what it is) that makes me mesmerized by Yoo Ah In’s performances.

      • it’s seems more likely to me that it’s about Jin O lives on because the novel will be read by hundreds of thousands of S. Koreans and he and the young purple who sacrificed for freedom will be remembered.
        That has merit.

        glad I have somebody else to enjoy that “thing” (that I don’t know what it is) that makes me mesmerized by Yoo Ah In’s performances
        I’ll be there watching every future performance with you. He is talented and yummy!

      • Beez says:

        We need to clone you first so you have time for real life, blogging all the shows you do, and finishing 6FD! (Just like I need to finish Secret Love Affair). It’s just so dark and sloooow and darrrrrk.

      • Winning the lottery would give me the time. Working for a living can be irksome!

      • Jane Tilly says:

        I concur “Writer Jin was clever NOT to make the two relationships parallel.” I’m glad the relationships were not parallel. If they had been, I would have thought the writer was trying to repeat fate. That would have been NO BUENO‼

        I liked Yoo Ah In from the first time I saw him in Sunkyunkwan Scandal. I put Yoo Ah In on my ‘must watch’ list after his performance in Six Flying Dragons 🐲. His acting is compelling and he is VERY easy to look at 👁👁‼. I think this was the best performance I’ve seen from the yummy Go Kyung Pyo.

      • Beez says:

        Speaking of yummy Go Kyung Pyo…
        https://www.dramafever.com/news/go-kyung-pyo-scores-his-first-leading-k-drama-role/

        Love the very short hair on him too. I think I love any hairstyle that gets the bangs off grown men’s foreheads.

      • I’m pleased he’s getting this opportunity. Thank you for sharing the link. He looks FABULOUS in the short hair. Truth be told I did NOT like his hairstyle in Chicago Typewriter.

      • Beez says:

        @Jane Tily you said my new trigger – “Six Flying Dragons”. I think I’m almost as bad about getting off on an admiration tangent as when someone says -[looks around blog to be sure DramaFan doesn’t hear] – *whisper* “Chuno”.

      • I liked Yoo Ah In from the first time I saw him in Sunkyunkwan Scandal. I put Yoo Ah In on my ‘must watch’ list after his performance in Six Flying Dragons 🐲. His acting is compelling and he is VERY easy to look at 👁👁‼.
        I’ve never finished SS. I paused at the archery contest and haven’t gone back. One day I’ll finish it. I’m at episode 4 of Six Flying Dragons just as the adult actors take over. This is a good series. Secret Love Affair was were Yoo Ah In caught my eye. His earnest desperate need for the leading lady made that show work.

        I think this was the best performance I’ve seen from the yummy Go Kyung Pyo.
        This was his best dramatic turn. I’d only considered him comic relief previously.

      • Beez says:

        The archery contest in Sunkyunkwan Scandal was hard for me to get thru as well.

        That was around my 3rd Kdrama,I think. Although, probably more like 9th or 10th because episode 1 turned me off so I dropped it and came back to it. At first, I just couldn’t buy Park Min Young as a guy. See looks like a tiny bird next to the guys. Then, at that time when I came back to it, in my culturally biased eyes, the fellows all looked so feminine to me which made me accept Park Min Young in the role better. After dropping it at Ep1,I went and watched everything Song Seung Heon ever appeared in and then came back to SScandal with a different outlook. (And it was really cute and enjoyable and actually had a political message about accepting who you fall in love with no matter their gender (Coffee Prince story in saegeuk).

        If anyone had told me Back then that I’d eventually be gobsmacked over Song joon ki and Yoo Ah in, I’d have said they were crazy.

        BTW, if you guys haven’t seen Song joon ki in A Werewolf Boy – it’s MUST see. Btw, Park Bo Young co-stars.

      • At first, I just couldn’t buy Park Min Young as a guy. See looks like a tiny bird next to the guys. Then, at that time when I came back to it, in my culturally biased eyes, the fellows all looked so feminine to me which made me accept Park Min Young in the role better.
        Good point. I have an issue with this particular plot device which doesn’t help.

        BTW, if you guys haven’t seen Song joon ki in A Werewolf Boy – it’s MUST see. Btw, Park Bo Young co-stars
        I went onto my Viki account and created a recommended collection to keep track of the shows everyone recommends. I do lose track sometimes.

      • Beez says:

        I never thought much of Song joon ki one way or the other, but I watched A Werewolf Boy just before he went into military service and I was chomping at the bit for him to come out. And, of course, he didn’t disappoint with DOTS.

      • Jane Tilly says:

        I liked Go Kyung Pyo’s short do more than I liked Yoo Ah In’s buzz cut. I don’t mind bangs on men, however I prefer their hair a bit longer. I admit I like men’s hair slicked back the best‼. Mmm I’m thinking about Ji Chang Wook with upswept hair…🤔

        Beez how many times have you ⌚-ed Six Flying 🐉 Dragons? I only saw it once,as it had 5⃣0⃣ EPISODES‼. I want to ⌚ it again, but I drag my feet to ⌚ anything over 30 episodes.

      • Beez says:

        @Jane Tilly, I’ve only watched it once but I recently downloaded all of the episodes (individually and it takes about 30 minutes reach). But many times when I’d check to see that it downloaded properly by fast forwarding and pausing here and there, I’d get hooked watching a scene and couldn’t stop myself from watching the entire episode.

      • Jane Tilly says:

        Song Joong Ki and Yoo Ah In both charmed me in Sunkyunkwan Scandal. I started looking for both of these mighty fine actors. Song Joong Ki wowed me with his performance in Werewolf 🐺 Boy.

  7. Beez says:

    @JT Before I rewatch 6FD,I want to watch Tree With Deep Roots again. I think I’ll appreciate it more now because when I first watched, I just wanted to stare at Jang Hyuk 🙂, plus the wuxia threw me off. (You know how I get once I fixate on something that irks me). Love real martial arts, can’t stand fake wire work that had people leaping 20 feet from a dead start or leaping onto rooftops in one jump.

    By the time I realized how interesting it was, it was almost over. So I’m going to watch it again, ignore the wuxia, and pay attention to the story being told right from the beginning.

    • Jane Tilly says:

      So wuxia is the fake wirework martial arts⁉

      In Joseon history Six Flying 🐉 Dragons comes 🐝4⃣ Deep Rooted 🌳 Tree, although Deep Rooted 🌳 Tree was broadcast first. I liked both of these dramas‼

      • Beez says:

        @JT – Right! Wuxia that I REALLY hate is like the end scene of Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon where the two opponents are fighting up in the trees, standing and jumping on to LEAVES – not even on to branches! It ruined an otherwise amazing movie for me. I know they used wire work for many of the fight scenes before that one (as most fight scenes do for safety and to complete some pretty amazing choreography), but as long as it doesn’t defy the natural laws of gravity or physics, I can appreciate it. But it has to be within the realm of possible.

        And yeah, I’m aware of the sequence of events regarding Tree and 6FD but, I have this thing whereby I believe films should always be viewed in the order originally aired. For example, my son wanted to introduce Star Wars to his nephew. I told him to have him watch the original (1970’s) movies first. Instead, be showed them in timeline order. By the time the kid got to the original REAL episode 1, he was unimpressed by just how awesome that first Jedi mind trick is because he’s seen it happen multiple times in the newer (2000’s) movies. Also, the mystery of who Yoda was that awed you in the first episode when you (like Luke) can’t imagine that this silly little annoying creature is the great master every ones been talking about. The kid already knew who Yoda was from the prequels. See? And many other things in a prequel that cause an original to appear mudane because the prequel is actually showing things that were built upon in the original.

        The same goes for the new Star Trek remakes. If a person starts with them, without having watched STOS (1960’s) and seen Spock’s struggles with his human vs. Vulcan side and trying to control his emotions (and what that meant to him), then watching the remake that has child Spock losing it and attacking another child over a “yo mama” joke doesn’t have the same weight or understanding attached to it.

        This is my personal philosophy and so I always watch things in the order aired target than the timeline of events they cover.

        (Just when you thought I couldn’t be a bigger nerd, I go and prove you wrong, right?) lol

      • I believe films should always be viewed in the order originally aired. For example, my son wanted to introduce Star Wars to his nephew. I told him to have him watch the original (1970’s) movies first.
        Concur. Star Wars is an excellent example of why your thought process is correct.

        (Just when you thought I couldn’t be a bigger nerd, I go and prove you wrong, right?
        I didn’t know you watched Star Trek, which I did as well. 👓 I will admit that Deep Space Nine, Star Trek: Voyager, and Star Trek: Enterprise never completely gripped me. I was a fan of the Original Series and Star Trek: The Next Generation.

      • Beez says:

        STOS all the way, baby! Showing my age but,I watched it during its original run in the late 60’s. Although I did enjoy the others.

      • Jane Tilly says:

        Hello NERD 🤓‼. It takes one to know one 🤓‼. I have to laugh at myself, as I completely understood what you meant and where you are coming from, including Star 🌟 Trek‼

        I see where you are coming from with air date. When it comes to Star 🌟 Wars, I would not have finished the series if I started with Episode 1, which was dreadful enough to not bothered with Episode 2 (I only ⌚-ed episodes 1-3 because I ❤-ed 4-6), then I would have missed the magic ✨ of Episodes 4, 5, and 6, which are classics.

        I don’t mind a bit of wuxia, but I prefer martial arts to appear to be realistic.

      • Beez says:

        @My Sister Nerd – I refuse to refer to the 2000’s trilogy as Eps1-3. They are 4-5-6 as far a I’m concerned. It causes non-ending arguments at my house because my son and daughter-in-law love to discuss Star Wars. When they say “in eposode 5, when…” I immediately interrupt and say “You mean episode 2.” And if they say “in episode 1″, I say, you mean that new crap, that’s really number 4, right?”

        I can’t help it. lol

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